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Thread: I promised I'd post it. My 924 project (pic heavy)

  1. #81
    100% Recycled Pixels. Twigsoffury's Avatar
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    Default Re: I promised I'd post it. My 924 project (pic heavy)

    Quote Originally Posted by OvRiDe View Post
    Not to nitpick ... but the Conquest was the Chrysler/Dodge name.. the Mitsubishi was called a Starion. The same car. Not sure what the Starion designation was, but the TSi version of the Conquest was absolutely crazy quick for it's time.

    I agree the widebody kits on the 924 does give it a lot of the same look, and I like it.
    hah well i've always seen a Mitsubishi badge along the rear trunk so i always assumed it was a mitsu, Guess i saw a Chrysler version later that said conquest and put the two together.


    And its always crazy to see a car that is as wide as a hummer H1 and only 4 or so foot tall.



    especially with deep dish rims.

    and FYI... yay someone else who knows about camber and contact patches. Forgot to mention that narrow sidewall tires also help keep your contact patch while under aggressive cornering (not those 1" low-pro tires.. real racing tires that look almost rounded along the lip) like this

    http://www.postrelease.com/asset/view/370.jpg


    Tires with large sidewall will also have center bulging at high speed that can dramatically decrease your CP with the ground. Thats the big difference between M+R rated tires and Z+ rated tires besides the compounds used.

    You'll also see a classic example of speed bulging when top fuelers roast the tires, or take off down the track



    But those tires are designed to do that, So they provide maximum grip at the starting line, then bulge up to create less friction down the line... the trade off is you'll see them sway back and forth going down the line, and its easy...so so easy to loose control.

  2. #82
    Custom Title Honors Snowman's Avatar
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    Default Re: I promised I'd post it. My 924 project (pic heavy)

    The suspension in the sand rail I was referencing once the rear tires are getting enough torque the entire suspension actually increases the camber to help grip more. It was set up for hill climbing which I know nothing about so I am not sure how it works completely.
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  3. #83
    100% Recycled Pixels. Twigsoffury's Avatar
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    Default Re: I promised I'd post it. My 924 project (pic heavy)

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowman View Post
    The suspension in the sand rail I was referencing once the rear tires are getting enough torque the entire suspension actually increases the camber to help grip more. It was set up for hill climbing which I know nothing about so I am not sure how it works completely.

    If its hill climbing you'd want a -/+ 0.00 camber i'd think to maintain the traction, plus its probably a locked rear differential so turning would be crap anyways.

    My jeep has locking front and rear differentials, You go and try to take any sort of corner and it feels like the wheels are going to fall off.

    ALSO! depends on the front steering set up. Mines a solid axle front and rear with bone-knuckle steering, So my wheels tilt to the side when i cut the wheel naturally.




    The steering and suspension is a lot different for sports cars then it is for big trucks with solid axles.

    My wheels look like they camber really really hard when i get up on bumps or rocks, but its just the design of the steering and the solid axle that make it look like that




    The wheel isn't actually physically cambered at all.

    But then again people come up with some crazy s#@t so hell there could be a active camber system out there.

  4. #84
    Mostly a nutcase CorsePerVita's Avatar
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    Default Re: I promised I'd post it. My 924 project (pic heavy)

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowman View Post
    The suspension in the sand rail I was referencing once the rear tires are getting enough torque the entire suspension actually increases the camber to help grip more. It was set up for hill climbing which I know nothing about so I am not sure how it works completely.
    Ah I think I see what you mean. As suspension compresses it's possible it could change things if the suspension is setup right. Essentially, yes, if enough torque is applied and the suspension compressed, I could see that happening. I thought you meant just engine rpms, but I see you mean as the car goes faster or more power is applied, etc etc.. would be interesting to see pictures of that setup.

    Probably going to finish up the brakes tomorrow. I got the master cyl rebuilt I just haven't posted pics. I'll snag some pics of the harness as I work on it too. Been a busy week for me so I haven't had much of a chance to update stuff.

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    Default Re: I promised I'd post it. My 924 project (pic heavy)

    speakin bout camber.


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    Mostly a nutcase CorsePerVita's Avatar
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    Default Re: I promised I'd post it. My 924 project (pic heavy)

    I haven't been on the forums in a while. Been crazy busy. Sorry all.

    Figured I'd update - I dropped the head and throttle bodies off at central composites. They are working on a carbon fiber intake manifold for me. I am pretty excited because I have had 2 different companies flake out on me on getting the manifold created, they finally took it serious, set a price, sat down and sketched up and made a mockup for me and got the ball rolling. They are INSANELY busy right now so I was told it wasn't "really high on priority" and is somewhat on the backburner but they will get it done soon as time allows it.

    Pretty excited! once that is done I can FINALLY start hooking it all up and tuning this thing.

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    Default Re: I promised I'd post it. My 924 project (pic heavy)

    Quote Originally Posted by CorsePerVita View Post
    I haven't been on the forums in a while. Been crazy busy. Sorry all.

    Figured I'd update - I dropped the head and throttle bodies off at central composites. They are working on a carbon fiber intake manifold for me. I am pretty excited because I have had 2 different companies flake out on me on getting the manifold created, they finally took it serious, set a price, sat down and sketched up and made a mockup for me and got the ball rolling. They are INSANELY busy right now so I was told it wasn't "really high on priority" and is somewhat on the backburner but they will get it done soon as time allows it.

    Pretty excited! once that is done I can FINALLY start hooking it all up and tuning this thing.

    Hey you would probably know this.


    Would polishing a intake manifold to the point where its basically a mirror on the inside make a substantial difference on a engine?

    we've got a 89' cobra intake manifold for a buddy's 86' lincoln.. and it looks pretty rough on the inside. I'm damn good at metal polishing, and i know that race cars do indeed do "port and polishing" on intake manifolds.


  8. #88
    Bottle of Whiskey! altec's Avatar
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    Default Re: I promised I'd post it. My 924 project (pic heavy)

    On the intake side you want a rough-to-touch finish. The important thing when doing porting work is that you want smooth transitions, not really polish. Get rid of any rough casting, and bulges. The rough finish is important for mixing your fuel. On the exhaust side, you can go at it as much as you like!

    You can also port match. Which is when you use the gasket as a guide to make the transition smooth. No edges sticking into one, or the other sides.

    In general, gains are saw from doing the lower intake, and heads. Upper doesn't cause much fuss.

    Google SBC porting. A ton of good guides on doing a small block Chevy, and it applies to any combustion engine (At least non-Direct Injection...).
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  9. #89
    Mostly a nutcase CorsePerVita's Avatar
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    Default Re: I promised I'd post it. My 924 project (pic heavy)

    Altec is spot on. You don't want glass smooth. I know that sounds counter-intuitive, but the best part of port and polish is getting rid of the impurities that came in the head and intake manifold from the factory (as you said, rough spots, nasty edges, metal pieces from casting sticking out). Basically think of it like fluid dynamics, while you want good flow (which is improved by taking out crap imperfections out of stuff) you also have to keep in mind that you want good atomization and mixture. A rough to the touch finish as altec has mentioned achieves that because a perfectly smooth service can leave the fuel on the wall of the runners.

    I recall seeing a really cool diagram that explained the phenomenon really well. Basically there was a tube that showed the flow of water through a pipe. On the walls of the pipe (the perfectly smooth area) the water flowed the SLOWEST, towards the middle of the pipe the velocity of the water was the FASTEST.

    Now.. change the water to fuel. What do you want fuel to do. You DO want it to mix with the air. What do you want it to NOT do? Fail to atomize (turn into droplets, come together). If you get a glass smooth port and polish the fuel tends to bind together, become droplets or run slowly along the wall instead of going where they need to.

    It's been shown that a semi-rough finish will result in better atomization/breakup/mixture of the fuel and better flow. It of course is most crucial for such a finish where the fuel actually enters. If you have an intake manifold that for instance mixes fuel (injector actually is near the valve) then it's a different story. However, on a setup like mine where the runner mixes the fuel up towards the ITB, the finish inside is crucial.

  10. #90
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    Default Re: I promised I'd post it. My 924 project (pic heavy)

    Oh and on a very happy note - i got a report today that the manifold mockup is done and they are currently shaping it. It will be finished hopefully this week. I am VERY excited.

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